Artificial Intelligence in Industry with Dan Faggella (automation)

Marshall Brain discusses how wetware (the human brain) is increasingly becoming a part of a bigger system which may in itself be managed by software systems. The roles and relationships of humans and machines are rapidly changing. With the increasing advances in technology, there are fewer and fewer skills or activities that an enterprise needs from human beings, and they only need those until they can be replaced by software or hardware.

For example, computer vision systems are often still not as effective as the human eye, so we still need human vision systems to recognize text or to recognize object placement, and take action accordingly (in a store, warehouse, or other setting). A human can fill that role as a piece of wetware until the software or the hardware catches up. How will man and machine collaborate in the future? We explore these dynamics in depth in this week's interview.

For more interviews and insights from leading thinkers in AI and automation, visit:

www.TechEmergence.com

Direct download: AI_in_Industry-Marshall_Brain-Mixdown.mp3
Category:Automation -- posted at: 7:31pm PST

Martin Ford on the Rise of Workforce Automation

Martin Ford started off as a software entrepreneur in Silicon Valley, but became better known for his speaking and writing on robotics' and automation's influence on the job market after writing his best-selling book, Rise of the Robots: Technology and the Threat of a Jobless Future. In this episode, Martin talks about why he believes 'white collar' jobs (as opposed to blue) are at a higher risk for automation, and gives his predictions on how automation and robotics will impact the job market over the next 5 to 10 years.

Direct download: Martin_Ford.mp3
Category:Automation -- posted at: 5:00pm PST

Advocating a More Sustainable Business Culture in an Automated World

How does automation influence society today? This is an open-ended question with likely endless answers that can be observed in many different areas of society. As a Writer, Speaker, and Professor in Media Theory and Economics, Douglas Rushkoff has made it his livelihood to examine the impacts of automation in our evolving digital society. In this episode, we speak about his 'disappointment' in how automation has been used by many industries without regard for employees' long-term well being, and how a cultural shift in industry priorities may be what's needed to make automation beneficial for the majority.

Direct download: Doug_Rushkoff.mp3
Category:Automation -- posted at: 6:30am PST

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